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  • Important Information regarding posting about Covid 19 Click Here

COVID vaccines, Booster Shots, Antivirals, ANTIGEN TESTS ( 25.11.21 - 65% in ICU unvaxed from 7% of adult pop )

Will you get vaccinated whenever a vaccine is available?

  • Yes

    Votes: 34 77.3%
  • No

    Votes: 7 15.9%
  • How much are you paying?

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Maybe later, when it proves effective.

    Votes: 3 6.8%

  • Total voters
    44

Robutnua

Member
Nov 28, 2018
13,848
6,260
I know .. I know, not another covid thread. BUT I really think this is worth separating out from the emerging virus thread ( Housekeeping so to speak )


Oxford scientists believe they have made a breakthrough in their quest for a Covid-19 vaccine after discovering that the jab triggers a response that may offer a "double defence" against the virus

Covid Vaccine Front-Runner Is Months Ahead of Her Competition - BLOOMBERG

The University of Oxford candidate, led by Sarah Gilbert, might be through human trials in September. AstraZeneca has lined up agreements to produce 2 billion doses. Could this be the one?
 
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Robutnua

Member
Nov 28, 2018
13,848
6,260
Moderna Set to Start Final-Stage Vaccine Trial in 30,000 People - BLOOMBERG

Moderna Inc. posted details of its final-stage vaccine trial on an official government website, confirming that the widely-anticipated trial was still on track to begin this month.

In a posting on ClinicalTrials.gov, Moderna said the trial is expected to begin on July 27. It will enroll 30,000 adults at high risk of contracting the coronavirus. The enrollees will help compare the vaccine to placebo injections and evaluate whether two doses of the vaccine, known as mRNA-1273, will keep people Covid-19 free.

Trial sites will begin registering people for the trial next week, said Moderna spokesman Ray Jordan.


The vaccine is one of the farthest along for Covid-19. Unlike traditional vaccines, which inject a weakened or inactivated virus or a piece of a virus to trigger an immune response, the Moderna product uses genetic material called messenger RNA to cause cells to produce the coronavirus spike protein. The goal is to produce antibodies to the virus that protect against disease when someone is later exposed to the coronavirus.
 

ruserious

Member
Dec 4, 2018
5,314
5,152
Whoever gets there first should allow the vaccine into the public domain and help vaccinate the world. One company should not hold power over such an important issue especially when the Trump regime is buying up mass supply.
 

Robutnua

Member
Nov 28, 2018
13,848
6,260
@ruserious

Whoever gets there first should allow the vaccine into the public domain and help vaccinate the world. One company should not hold power over such an important issue especially when the Trump regime is buying up mass supply.
Geneva/London, 15 July 2020 – Seventy-five countries have submitted expressions of interest to protect their populations and those of other nations through joining the COVAX Facility, a mechanism designed to guarantee rapid, fair and equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines worldwide.

The 75 countries, which would finance the vaccines from their own public finance budgets, partner with up to 90 lower-income countries that could be supported through voluntary donations to Gavi’s COVAX Advance Market Commitment (AMC). Together, this group of up to 165 countries represents more than 60% of the world’s population. Among the group are representatives from every continent and more than half of the world’s G20 economies.

The countries submitting expressions of interest include Argentina, Armenia, Brazil, Canada, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Kuwait, Luxembourg, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Montenegro, New Zealand, North Macedonia, Norway, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates and the United Kingdom.
 

Cathal

Member
May 27, 2020
1,746
859
Whoever gets there first should allow the vaccine into the public domain and help vaccinate the world. One company should not hold power over such an important issue especially when the Trump regime is buying up mass supply.
Let’s hope it’s the Swedes.

 

Robutnua

Member
Nov 28, 2018
13,848
6,260
Millions could be vaccinated against COVID-19 as UK secures strong portfolio of promising vaccines - GOV.UK
  • The UK government has secured early access to 90 million vaccine doses from the BioNTech/Pfizer alliance and Valneva with more in the pipeline as part of its strategy to build a portfolio of promising new vaccines to protect the UK from COVID-19
  • In addition, treatments containing COVID-19-neutralising antibodies have been secured from AstraZeneca to protect those who cannot receive vaccines
  • UK public encouraged to sign up to a new NHS website to make it quicker and easier for potential volunteers to join vital studies that could help save lives – the aim is to get 500,000 people signed up by October
 

Statsman

The nice one, or so it seemed.
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Nov 28, 2018
10,770
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Millions could be vaccinated against COVID-19 as UK secures strong portfolio of promising vaccines - GOV.UK
  • The UK government has secured early access to 90 million vaccine doses from the BioNTech/Pfizer alliance and Valneva with more in the pipeline as part of its strategy to build a portfolio of promising new vaccines to protect the UK from COVID-19
  • In addition, treatments containing COVID-19-neutralising antibodies have been secured from AstraZeneca to protect those who cannot receive vaccines
  • UK public encouraged to sign up to a new NHS website to make it quicker and easier for potential volunteers to join vital studies that could help save lives – the aim is to get 500,000 people signed up by October
None of these vaccines actually exist yet. Unicorn vaccines.
 
D

Deleted member 146

Guest
COVAXIN, the Indian response went to human trials today too.
 

Robutnua

Member
Nov 28, 2018
13,848
6,260
Jaysus they everywhere. Good news being most of the pharma inc AZ and pfizer are here

 

Outlander

Member
Feb 15, 2019
606
637
Away
None of these vaccines actually exist yet. Unicorn vaccines.
I don't have the link, but I have read that the vaccines are being mass produced even before the clinical trials are complete. They will be available immediately following successful trials, shortening the usual wait time.
 

Statsman

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I don't have the link, but I have read that the vaccines are being mass produced even before the clinical trials are complete. They will be available immediately following successful trials, shortening the usual wait time.
And therefore potentially fatal.
 
D

Deleted member 146

Guest
And therefore potentially fatal.
I don't think that's a real risk. If they don't successfully complete clinical trials the socks couldn't be used anyway, but there's nothing in the technology used to suggest there's any risk of fatality, it uses a genetically engineered replication-deficient version of the common cold, and there's been no serious adverse reactions in the trials so far beyond what's typical for a vaccine anyway.

The Oxford/AstraZenica AZD1222 vaccine, and most (if not all i think) those which have made it to stage 2 clinical trial are Adenoviral vector vaccines. Like inactivated virus vaccines (MMR etc.) they're designed to trick the body into thinking it's been infected and respond, thus making us inhospitable for the deal illness should be we exposed.
The problem with AVVS is whether of not a second or subsequent boosters are needed. In previous cases the first dose had the intended response, developing the antibodies needed to protect us, but with a second the body then attacks the vaccine with the same response. But they've delivered a second dose to a small number of the trial participants and so far the reaction has been positive.

Messenger RNA is the other "experimental" type. As far as I know there are 2 in development and have entered clinical trials (Moderna and CureVac). This saw some promising success when funding was poured into finding a response to the Zika virus, outside of effectiveness what became apparent here was that lower doses were needed and they were cheaper and quicker to manufacture. It is technology which has been around since the 90s but there were problems making it effective, those working on them now believe that they can now overcome those. These vaccines work by instructing the body to produce disease specific antigen, they do this thorough messenger RNA - essentially the instructions the body gets to produce cells. Unlike both inactive and adenoviral vector they're pre-instructing production of it, rather than introducing a version of the pathogen (in this case COVID or derivatives thereof) and kicking the body's immune system into response.

Given the potential efficacy, and also how much cheaper and safer they are, developing an effective mRNA vaccine for COVID would be the most exciting, and long term most beneficial in terms of public health, outcome. But it seems AVV is the one which is progressing fastest and I think we'd take that trade off to get back to normal as soon as possible. I'd hope that funding for research into mRNA doesn't slow down or disappear.
 

Statsman

The nice one, or so it seemed.
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I don't think that's a real risk. If they don't successfully complete clinical trials the socks couldn't be used anyway, but there's nothing in the technology used to suggest there's any risk of fatality, it uses a genetically engineered replication-deficient version of the common cold, and there's been no serious adverse reactions in the trials so far beyond what's typical for a vaccine anyway.

The "Oxford" vaccine, and most (if not all i think) those which have made it to stage 2 clinical trial are Adenoviral vector vaccines. Like inactivated virus vaccines (MMR etc.) they're designed to trick the body into thinking it's been infected and respond, thus making us inhospitable for the deal illness should be we exposed.
The problem with AVVS is whether of not a second or subsequent boosters are needed. In previous cases the first dose had the intended response, developing the antibodies needed to protect us, but with a second the body then attacks the vaccine with the same response. But they've delivered a second dose to a small number of the trial participants and so far the reaction has been positive.

Messenger RNA is the other "experimental" type. As far as I know there are 2 in development and have entered clinical trials (Moderna and CureVac). This saw some promising success when funding was poured into finding a response to the Zika virus, outside of effectiveness what became apparent here was that lower doses were needed and they were cheaper and quicker to manufacture. It is technology which has been around since the 90s but there were problems making it effective, those working on them now believe that they can now overcome those. These vaccines work by instructing the body to produce disease specific antigen, they do this thorough messenger RNA - essentially the instructions the body gets to produce cells. Unlike both inactive and adenoviral vector they're pre-instructing production of it, rather than introducing a version of the pathogen (in this case COVID or derivatives thereof) and kicking the body's immune system into response.

Given the potential efficacy, and also how much cheaper and safer they are, developing an effective mRNA vaccine for COVID would be the most exciting, and long term most beneficial in terms of public health, outcome. But it seems AVV is the one which is progressing fastest and I think we'd take that trade off to get back to normal as soon as possible. I'd hope that funding for research into mRNA doesn't slow down or disappear.
The problem with short-term trials is that they show that the vaccine is useful for the short term; the reason most vaccine trials last a year is because you want the vaccine to be effective for at least that long. If you test for three months, and then start delivering the vaccine to the general population, there's a real risk that everyone goes back to normal and in the fourth month you have an enormous second wave.
 
D

Deleted member 146

Guest
The problem with short-term trials is that they show that the vaccine is useful for the short term; the reason most vaccine trials last a year is because you want the vaccine to be effective for at least that long. If you test for three months, and then start delivering the vaccine to the general population, there's a real risk that everyone goes back to normal and in the fourth month you have an enormous second wave.
True, but that's why they're also testing a second dose.
 

Statsman

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True, but that's why they're also testing a second dose.
Which is fine if they plan on administering second doses within months in the general population; will the general population play ball?
 
D

Deleted member 146

Guest
Which is fine if they plan on administering second doses within months in the general population; will the general population play ball?
It may not be needed, but that's why things like COVI-PASS might become necessary.
 

Robutnua

Member
Nov 28, 2018
13,848
6,260

Researchers are making "good progress" in developing vaccines against Covid-19, with a handful in late-stage trials, but their first use cannot be expected until early 2021, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

At least its a target date for peoples head to see some sort of potential end
 

Statsman

The nice one, or so it seemed.
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If a person who refuses to use a vaccine arrives at A&E and is diagnosed with Covid 19, I wouldn't be in any rush to treat them.
You'd have signed up to an oath that says otherwise.
 
Apr 24, 2020
2,203
2,078
Just ask them if they are willing to accept administration of a vaccine as part of their treatment. If they say no, then respect their choice.
If you present at a hospital with covid, what is a vaccine going to bring to the party? Literally the horse has bolted...
 

Statsman

The nice one, or so it seemed.
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I'm not sure what the debate is here.

If people are foolish enough to refuse the (as yet nonexistent) vaccine then I have very little sympathy for them.

Sin é.
I'm inordinately glad you're not a doctor.
 

Vega1447

Member
Feb 17, 2019
2,781
1,888
I'm inordinately glad you're not a doctor.
I am, just not of medicine..

You do see the contradiction in refusing a vaccine for a viral infection then presenting for treatment? For the same viral infection?

Sure treat them but if I was a medical doc treating them and they recovered I'd mention how a jab in the shoulder would have saved them a world of pain.
 
Apr 24, 2020
2,203
2,078
I am, just not of medicine..

You do see the contradiction in refusing a vaccine for a viral infection then presenting for treatment? For the same viral infection?

Sure treat them but if I was a medical doc treating them and they recovered I'd mention how a jab in the shoulder would have saved them a world of pain.
And God knows who else they infected...
 
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